Australia: The Land Where Time Began

A biography of the Australian continent 

Mt Scoria Conservation Park

Mt Scoria Conservation Park, Queensland

What's special?        Photo Gallery

Rising 150m above the cultivated plains, Mt Scoria is a striking local landmark protected in Mt Scoria National Park. Formed by volcanic activity 20–26 million years ago, this volcanic plug features many-sided basalt columns.

This small park in Queensland’s Brigalow belt contains open woodlands with poplar gums, Moreton Bay ash, forest red gums and silver-leaved ironbarks and small patches of brigalow. An open semi-evergreen vine thicket growing on rocky slopes towards the summit and around the base of the mountain is a relict of much wetter times. This vegetation is now uncommon in central eastern Queensland.

Mt Scoria is part of the traditional lands of the Gangulu people.

Exploring Mt Scoria

Have a bush picnic. Picnic shelters, tables, toilets, tank water, wood barbecues and bins are provided. Go birdwatching or simply enjoy the local wildlife.

Please do not strike the basalt columns as this can cause substantial damage. Camping is not allowed in the park.

Walking

No tracks are provided. Beware of the loose scree slopes if you climb to the top of the mountain.

Getting there

Mt Scoria is 6km south of Thangool near Biloela in central Queensland. Access is from the Burnett Highway.

Links

Mt Scoria Conservation Park- Thangool

Sources & Further reading

 

 
Email:  admin@austhrutime.com
Last updated 05/08/2010

 

Adventure Tracks
Deserts
Hydrology
Inselbergs
Glacial Maximum
Volcanoes of Australia
Salt
Central Australia
Eastern Australia
Cape York Peninsula
Rifting
Drifting
Nullarbor Plain
Palaeogene
Pangaea
Ranges
Rodinia
The Great Journey North
   Stages on the Way
The Great Journey South
Gawler Craton
Precambrian Ice Age
Home
Journey Back Through Time
Geology
Biology
     Fauna
     Flora
Climate
Hydrology
Environment
Experience Australia
Aboriginal Australia
National Parks
Photo Galleries
Site Map
                                                                                           Author: M.H.Monroe  Email: admin@austhrutime.com     Sources & Further reading